Modern Knife Sheaths

We have a long-standing history of making quality knife sheaths for the modern knife. . Whether you wish to coordinate a sheath with one of our gun rigs or with your existing gear, replace a kydex sheath which lacks for personal aethetics or whether you simply need a sheath for a knife which has none, send us the knife and we can get the job done. All our sheaths are built to exacting standards with security and safety to both knife and wearer in mind.
This is not the complete list of sheaths that we make. These are merely the highlights and give a good overview of the most common sheath styles.

Backfire Border Sheath

Light Mahogany

Pouch

Double Backfire Border

When a knife has a small guard, safety straps are sometimes difficult to make work. The sheath that works very nicely for these knives is a folded pouch with a bump-out to accomodate the guard. Since the knife is buried quite deeply in the sheath, it is both safe and stable.

Greg's Liberty Sheath

Light Mahogany

Bowie

Maricopa Flower

One of the things that folks like about our work is our ability to match patterns and colors. The work started out with a 1911 holster. That is it beside the knife so you can see that the knife is rather large. If it was mounted on the belt in a straight-up carry position, it would likely not have required a safety strap. Since it was to be raked quite radically forward, a safety strap was added to guarantee the knife stayed where it should.

Barry's Sheath

Light Mahogany (heavily oiled)

Pouch

Snake T, Teton Lace and Vine Border

As you might guess, this is a pouch style sheath for a knife with an integral guard. (click on photo to see knife outside of sheath). As a result, the pouch has a straight profile along the mainseam rather than a bump out as our 1st example had.

Chris' Sheath

British Tan with dark background and chocolate lace

Pouch

Elko Rose Floral

The head of this knife was buried deep into the pouch to give the illusion of an eagle coming out of an enclosed nest. (Not an explanation that is reality-driven, but it works as a description.) The sheath itself is of a pouch style, with full double loop lace and buckstitching. The sheath was made to match Chris' Gun Rig from the Single Action pages.

Dave's Knife Sheath

Havana

Butterflied Pouch

Hamley Geometric with Sunset & Celtic Twist Border

This sheath was constructed for a medium size knife. Because there was a wide border plus the Hamley geometric, it was decided that the better path to take would be to wrap the border around the back of the sheathfrom front to back rather than try to run it around the front perimeter. The result was a very pleasant pattern with eye candy at the leading edge as well as over the full front. We thought the effect quite pleasing and show it here as yet another option for tooling.

 

Ennis Sheath

Light Mahogany

Pouch

Meanea Bronc Rein Border

This sheath is the match to our Ennis and Ennis Field Holsters. The Border design is over 100 years old and still looks as good as the day when Frank Meanea was using it on his holsters. Like the sheath above, we elected to take the border to the back of the sheath rather than to squeeze it into the narrow panel that makes the side up. This gives the long, narrow pouch a bold and elegant yet sleek appearance.

Rattlesnake Sheath

Light Mahogany with Rattlesnake Inlay

Pouch

Untooled

Now and again, folks show up on our doorstep with dead things. No, we do not do any tanning, but we are most certainly willing to use the skins of whatever it is that's been professionally tanned to do your bidding. This little North Dakota prairie rattler adds a nice touch to this sheath.

Meanea Pouch Sheath

Dark Mahogany

Pouch

Meanea Bud Floral and Repeating 9's Border

This is a modern knife in a modern pouch with a pattern that started life in Frank Meanea's shop over 100 years ago. Timeless.

 

Jim's Knife Sheath

British Tan with dark background

Butterflied Bowie Sheath

Huntigton Floral

This little knife had enough of a guard to be outfitted with a safety strap. It also had a rather serious drop point. Instead of doing the sheath with a straight profile on the front of the blade, the sheath was split halfway up and a welt installed. (That sort of makes it a 3/4 welt rather than a full one.) The sheath laid flat before stitching gives the impression of a butterfly with its wings stretched out. Hence the names of things!
The reason for this treatment is to stabilize the knife as much as possible within the sheth. A stable knife is a safer knife.

 

Chug's Bugout Sheath

British Tan with dark background

Dagger Pouch

Waterlily with Black Widow Onlay

This sheath is for a rather beligerent-looking SCAR Archangel. (Click on the picture to see knife outside of its sheath). The sheath itself is a mate to "Chug's Bug's" the so-dubbed Bugout Chest rig we created for its owner in the Semi-Auto section. Yes, we had a great deal of fun with it!

Everett's Sheath

Havana

Deger Wrap

Untooled

This is another treatment for a knife with a short guard. The strap keeps the knife safe while the extension up the handle gives good protection. The handle is a bit more accessible for folks with large hands. This was not a large knife so the pouch was a most fitting choice!

Don's Knife Sheath

British Tan

Buck Wrap

Bud and Scroll Floral

Don is our photographer and a great friend so, every once in a while, we have to do something nice for him. This is a very respectable stag handled field knife with a sensible blade profile and a small guard. He asked us to protect the knife as much as possible yet still allow his very large hands to get on the handle easily. This sheath solved all the issues.
The sheath is constructed a bit like the Deger Wrap with the front of the knife protected by a shield coming up out of the sheath's body. The safety strap comes from behind, overlaps and snaps down.

 

Vic's Knife Sheath

Light Mahogany

Dagger Pouch

untooled

This knife was very small -- no more than 5" overall. It had a long triangular blade and a very pointy tip. Rather than risk the point going through the front of the sheath, we opted for a full welt running the entire perimeter of the blade. The welt extends very slightly into the handle area & protects the stitches here from accidental cuts.

The decorative oval shows off a piece of flower snake we had kicking around the shop. normally, snake skin is cut down the center of the belly. this one was cut down the center leaving the belly to form the center of this diminutive little inlay.

 

Ramsey's Knife Sheath

Golden

Butterflied Pouch

Hawk Stomp and Crow's Head

We don't often use the word "nasty" when dealing with knives, but this one had the makings. The blade and handle form a continuous curve with the blade shaped more like a talon than anything. It was not only an intimidating little knife but it was very small. The entire knife was no longer than 6" or 6-1/2" at best. It came with a kydex sheath which did a good job of keeping it at bay but which was indescribably ugly. The knife belonged to a really good friend so after being bribed with a very nice lunch, we accepted the challenge. It was a difficult knife to deal with becasue of the reverse blade profile. Once we settled on the butterfly pouch style, things fell into shape. &, yes, we're gonna try and get another lunch out of him for our efforts!

 

Phil's Knife Sheath

Light Mahogany

Butterflied Pouch

Bud & Scroll Floral

As you might guess by the shape of the sheath, the likelihood of this being for a drop point hunter with an integral guard is pretty certain. There was no guard for a safety strap so the best option was to bury the knife in a pouch style sheath with a 3/4 butterfly welt.

 

Folder

British Tan with dark background

Folder

Long Spade Leaf Floral

Yes, we do make them! Most of our folders are done up in similar sheaths. They are molded with a narrow stitched rim. The flap and back are a single piece with the belt loop generally in the form of a tunnel loop on the back. We do not stock any particular size as we feel each should be made for the knife it is intended for. There are simply too many thicknesses, widths and heights in folding knives to consider otherwise.